Changing Scenario of Agricultural Production in Madurai District of Tamil Nadu

  • T. Veerapandi PhD Scholar, Department of Environmental Economics, School of Economics, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai, Tamil Nadu, India
  • T. Ramanathan Assistant Professor, Department of Environmental Economics, School of Economics, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai, Tamil Nadu, India
Keywords: Agriculture, Crop Production, Adaptation, Livelihood

Abstract

India has a lengthy history of agriculture that dates back ten thousand years. Indian agriculture was developed about 9000 BC as a result of early plant domestication and crop and animal domestication. With the advancement of agricultural tools and methods, life quickly began. Indian economy was renowned for centuries for self-contained village communities prior to the introduction of British Rule. Agriculturists, cottage industrialists, village craftsmen, artisan professions, unskilled labourers, and village administrators made up village communities.
In addition to supplying the requirements of the village economy, these communities were able to create and export a variety of goods to other nations. Agriculture was a way of life at the time, and farmers only produced for their own consumption. Food crops like wheat and rice were the most significant ones. People began to revere and respect plants and animals since they were seen as necessary to their survival.
In India, farmers often cultivate crops on a small plot of land with the help of their families. The farmer and his family consume the majority of the crops produced by this method; there is very little extra to be sold on the market. For more than 700 years, this kind of agriculture has dominated the nation and continues to do so in many regions of India.

Published
2023-09-01
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How to Cite
Veerapandi, T., & Ramanathan, T. (2023). Changing Scenario of Agricultural Production in Madurai District of Tamil Nadu. Shanlax International Journal of Economics, 11(4), 40-45. https://doi.org/10.34293/economics.v11i4.6665
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Articles