An Investigation into the Effects of Demographic Factors on EFL Learners’ Self-Efficacy Beliefs

  • Mohammadreza Valizadeh Department of Translation and Interpretation (English), Faculty of Humanities Cappadocia University, Cappadocia, Turkey
Keywords: Self-efficacy beliefs, Individual differences, Demographic factors, EFL learners

Abstract

This study investigated the level of self-efficacy beliefs of Turkish university learners who majored in English. Moreover, the effects of demographic factors of gender, grade level, types of initial motivation to enter a university, and living circumstances on participants’ self-efficacy levels were explored. The participants were 301 undergraduate Turkish university learners who majored in English. Their self-efficacy was evaluated using a students’ self-efficacy scale, which measured their self-efficacy within the category of self-efficacy for self-regulated learning. The data were analysed quantitatively. A relatively good (moderate) level of self-efficacy for self-regulated learning was found for Turkish English as a Foreign Language (EFL) university learners. There was a significant difference between the self-efficacy of males and females in favour of females. However, the magnitude of the differences in the means was below medium. Moreover, the participants’ self-efficacy level did not vary by grade level and living circumstances (i.e., living alone, living with parents, living in a shared room/apartment, living in a dormitory) during the academic year. Additionally, there was not a significant difference in the self-efficacy levels of the group with initial intrinsic motivation and the group with initial extrinsic motivation to enter a university. The results of this research can be insightful for the field of educational psychology.

Published
2021-09-01
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How to Cite
Valizadeh, M. (2021). An Investigation into the Effects of Demographic Factors on EFL Learners’ Self-Efficacy Beliefs. Shanlax International Journal of Education, 9(4), 300-308. https://doi.org/10.34293/education.v9i4.4178
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Articles