Using Principal Components Regression (PCR) to Predict the Nexus between Institutional Training and Development Programs and Employer Performance in Private Universities in Ghana

Keywords: Training, Development, Employer, Performance

Abstract

Aim: This study examined the nexus between institutional training and development and employee performance from private universities in Ghana using Principal Components Regression (PCR).
Methodology: The study employed exploratory design through the quantitative and cross-sectional survey methods for data collection. The questionnaires were administered t0 384 respondents from the private universities.
Findings: The study revealed that training on leadership behaviour and development modules is more prevalent in the private universities in Ghana (M= 3.2669, SD = 0.6918, Skewness = -0.8262, p-value = 0.0000). The correlation results revealed a significant positive relationship between on-job training (r=0.3570*, p-value = 0.000), off-job training (r= 0.2893*, p-value = 0.000), training on leadership behaviours (r=0.4019*, p-value = 0.000) and training on development modules and employee performance (r=0.5917*, p-value = 0.000). Using PCR, the results revealed that there is a significant combined effect of on-job training, off-job training, training on leadership behaviour and development modules on employees’ performance (F-statistic = 54.512, p-value =0.000<0.05).
Recommendation: it is recommended that private universities intensify more efforts to train their employees. Also,institutional training and development programmes at the private universities in Ghana should emphasized more on-job training and off-job training and further improve their activities of development modules training and leadership.

Published
2023-12-01
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How to Cite
Ntumi, S. (2023). Using Principal Components Regression (PCR) to Predict the Nexus between Institutional Training and Development Programs and Employer Performance in Private Universities in Ghana. Shanlax International Journal of Education, 12(1), 86-103. https://doi.org/10.34293/education.v12i1.6835
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Articles